SCOLA Travel Journal: Week Eighteen

Scrolling through newspapers on Foreign Text I have to pause and do a double take when I see Georgia listed as a country. Georgia? A country? But that can’t be right…Georgia is a state in the southern United States! I must research this further so I head on over to Country Overview Videos under the Language Training Materials. Here I learn that Georgia is also the name of a country in Europe. I also learn about Georgia’s climate, education system, government, and much, much more! However, as we have learned in the past through SCOLA On the Street Videos, what better way to learn about a country than to experience it?

I don’t have to waste any time searching for my passport or packing my bags, as soon as I log on to On the Street Videos I am on my way to Georgia! The first thing that catches my eye as I arrive in Tbilisi is a flower bazaar. There are so many different kinds of flowers, with florists working hard to make bouquets for their customers. It would be a shame to return from my trip without a souvenir, so I buy a dozen roses and continue on my way.

My next stop in Georgia is a history museum. Since I was completely unaware of this country until today, I’d like to know about the country’s past. I meet with Mrs. Tamar Abunadze and Mrs. Ekha Maizuradze, both employees of the history museum. While talking to the women I learn about the Khazbegi region, a mythological story about Sameba, and about the life of Georgian Queen Tamar.

As I head home from this adventure with On the Street Videos, I am feeling very enlightened! Waking up today I never thought I would be exploring a country that was completely new to me! I can’t wait to continue my adventures with SCOLA On the Street Videos next week!

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Want to go to School in Georgia? Read this First!

Most students in the United States have either already gone back to school, or are anxiously preparing to in the next few weeks. However, students in Georgia, our Country of the Month, can still enjoy lazy days of sleeping in late and hanging out with friends until mid-September. Although schools in Georgia don’t return from summer vacation until later in the year, there are some ways that they are similar to schools in the United States.

Georgia has public and private schools. Public schools are free, however private schools are expensive and can cost around $3,000-$5,000 per year. Private school students have the opportunity to join different clubs, such as Art, Drama, and Science. Private schools also offer a school bus as a means of transportation to and from home for their students.

Students in Georgia go to school for twelve years. The first step of the Georgian education program lasts four years and is much like primary school in the United States. Children generally have 4-5 classes per day, which last approximately 45 minutes each. Students study courses such as Math, Georgian Language, Art, Music, Nature, PE and English. Students attend school five days a week, Monday through Friday.

After the first four years of school, students move on and acquire more subjects including Chemistry, Physics, Algebra, Geometry, and Russian. On average, students at these grade levels take 6-7 classes per day. After the 9th grade, students have the option to stop their education, or continue on, finishing with 12th grade. After 12th grade, students can take the National Examination for Universities if they would like to further their education.

So, does Georgia sound like a country you would like to attend school in? Tell us in the comment section below!

Want to learn more about the education systems in other countries? Check out On the Street Videos and experience what life is like for an economics student in Madagascar, discover the shortages of qualified teachers in Namibia, explore the life of a student in his final school years at a teachers college in Burundi, and so much more! Visit scola.org today for your free trial.

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