SCOLA Travel Journal: Week Twelve

The days are flying by as I travel around the world with SCOLA and it’s already time for my next international adventure! I log on to People and Places to try to get a feel about what country I would like to see in person next. I scroll through photos and Mersin Beach, the Cave of Heaven, and snapshots of protestors in Turkey catch my eye.

I first log on to Language Training Materials and take a look at Country Overview Videos from Turkey. Here I learn about where Turkey is located, the languages spoken in Turkey, its economy, and so much more!

I’d love to be able to chat with the locals about the photos of people protesting, so I log on to Insta-Class for some convenient, ready to use language lessons in Turkish. The service has over 450 Turkish lessons in beginner, intermediate, superior, and advanced. I fly through those and I am on my way!

To begin my adventure in Turkey I log on to SCOLA On the Street Videos. I am most curious about the photos of the protestors I stumbled across in People and Places, so my first stop is to visit Taksim Square in Istanbul. Taksim Square was recently the site of many protests, with many people showing up to support the park instead of turning it into a mall. I also learn about a series of protests that occurred last year, in which workers, teachers, doctors, dentists, and engineers all joined in on the strike. They marched around Mersin chanting and holding signs, urging the government to listen.

For my next stop in Turkey, I wanted to learn more about a lighter subject, so I talk to some of the locals about their favorite hobbies. One young girl shows me games she plays on her computer, then I watch a young photographer take shots of young children in a variety of settings.

I was able to see a few different sides of Turkey today, and because of that I consider this trip a success! Join me in my travels today by visiting www.scola.org and accessing your free trial!

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Learn a New Language and Be Happy

     Doa, our provider from Turkey, continues to help SCOLA users learn about new languages and cultures by sending SCOLA material from her country. Recently, Doa shared her thoughts on learning new languages and how SCOLA can help you meet your language learning goals:

     “Hi, I’m Doa from Turkey. I have been sending material to SCOLA for 7 years.  These material are mainly TV programming, videos, photographs, newspapers and magazines. Also I translate part of a TV show every week. Then I prepare a Turkish lesson from this translation and  I add questions and vocabulary. If you want to learn Turkish, you can find the Turkish and English translation on the same page.  You could learn a few words in Turkish every week. While you are listening to the video you can read the English translation.  You could learn Turkish by yourself.

       I record TV programs in 5 different languages every day. These languages are Turkish, Zaza, Georgian, Kurdish and Arabic. In Turkey there are Turkish, Kurdish, Zaza, Sorani, Arabic, Circassian and Laz people. They can all speak Turkish and their native languages.   Some Turkish television channels broadcast in these languages.

     I cannot speak Kurdish or Zaza but while I’m recording the news shows on TV,  I always feel like learning these languages. I say myself “Kurdish people can speak Turkish why don’t I speak Kurdish or Zaza?”

     Most recently, Doa has started sending SCOLA “Ma“. “Ma” is a culture, art and literature magazine about the Zaza people and was first published in May 2013. The magazine  was founded by musicians Mikail Aslan and Devrim Tekinoglu. “Ma” is very important work for Zaza people since it will help their language live so new generations will not forget their native language.

     Since Zaza people mainly live in Turkey they mostly speak Turkish, therefore the Zaza language is in danger of being forgotten. In recent years, Zaza people have been producing more literature works to improve their language. “Ma” magazine is one of the pioneers of this mission. Zaza people living in countries other than Turkey are looking for a way to obtain “Ma” and SCOLA will be an easy and accessible way for them to read the magazine.

   Doa’s final thought was “Listening to a different language always encourages me to learn it. It is good to know.  My grandfather always said “Speaking one language makes you one person, speaking two languages makes you two persons.”   Learn a new language and be happy.”

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Behind the Scenes: Meet Soza

This summer, SCOLA received new material from Syria for our Foreign Text and International Radio services. We could not have acquired any of this information without our Syrian provider, Soza. Soza has been very active in sending uSoza.photography.s material for many of our services, including On the Street Videos and Savoir-Vivre.

Soza is 22 years old and from the northeastern city of Qamishli. A Soza.photographyvariety of people, including Muslims, Assyrians, Armenians, Arabs, Kurds and Christians live peacefully in Qamishli. Soza speaks Kurdish, Arabic, English, and Turkish. She would like to learn French one day as well. Soza had to learn Turkish when her family took refuge in Turkey as a result of the Syrian war. Because of her language skills she was able to get a job as a translator at a Turkish trading company and there she learned Turkish.

The war has been hard on Soza because she lost one of her best friends in it and it has prevented her from continuing her education. Soza was in her fourth year of studying Psychology at Damascus University, but she had to quit because of the war. Someday she hopes to go back.

Soza has also volunteered for the Syrian Society for Social Development in her free time. The society aims to rehabilitate prisoners under the age of eighteen. She currently volunteers with a variety of other charities that help Syrian refugees. Soza has also previously worked as an Arabic and English teacher.syrian society for social development

Soza’s favorite SCOLA services are International Radio, Savoir-Vivre, On the Street Videos, Language Training Materials, Foreign Text and People and Places. Soza’s hobbies include photography and music. The photos in this post were all taken by her. Soza also enjoys teaching students about her language and culture. Soza says she will continue working with her charities anسنغd hobbies because that is what she treasures.

SCOLA appreciates the material Soza sends and we appreciate the fact that she is helping our subscribers learn so much about Syria and the Arabic language.

To view the material Soza and other providers from around the world have sent visit http://www.scola.org.

 

 

 

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