SCOLA Travel Journal: Week Twenty-Five

I sit down at my computer and soon I am off on my next adventure with SCOLA‘s newest and most exciting service, Savoir-Vivre. So far with Savoir-Vivre I have been able to travel to a zoo in Macedonia where I discovered komodo dragons in Indonesia and migratory birds in Japan, and I also visited a hotel in Thailand where it was recommended I try the delicious food at Mozem Soba House in Japan, and went on a family holiday in Port Harcourt, toured Bhaktapur City in Nepal, and went dolphin watching in Bali! With all this adventure you would think I’d be worn out, but traveling the world with Savoir-Vivre is made easy! All it takes is a few clicks of my mouse and I am ready for my next journey.

Spring has sprung here in Iowa, and many plants are starting to bloom. This makes me wonder what kind of plants are grown in other parts of the world, and where could I buy them? I click on the flower icon on the Savoir-Vivre map to find out. I’m instantly transported to the streets of Iran where I can walk forward until I find a flower shop called Aftab. I explore the flower shop and quickly discover Native Plants found around the world. I travel to India where a group of people plant trees on World Environment Day, to Turkey where a man sells cactus on the streets of Mersin, and then to Syria where I meet women working on a cotton farm. A short time later I am exploring different flower shops in places like Georgia, India, and Indonesia. After my adventures I find myself back in Aftab, ready to see where Savoir-Vivre will take me next!

I may not have the time or money to travel around the world learning about other cultures, but that didn’t stop me from experiencing several countries today! Join me on my adventure with a free log in for our blog followers. User username WordPress and password Scola2015 at www.scola.org to access Savoir-Vivre and other wonderful SCOLA services for FREE!

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SCOLA Travel Journal: Week Twelve

The days are flying by as I travel around the world with SCOLA and it’s already time for my next international adventure! I log on to People and Places to try to get a feel about what country I would like to see in person next. I scroll through photos and Mersin Beach, the Cave of Heaven, and snapshots of protestors in Turkey catch my eye.

I first log on to Language Training Materials and take a look at Country Overview Videos from Turkey. Here I learn about where Turkey is located, the languages spoken in Turkey, its economy, and so much more!

I’d love to be able to chat with the locals about the photos of people protesting, so I log on to Insta-Class for some convenient, ready to use language lessons in Turkish. The service has over 450 Turkish lessons in beginner, intermediate, superior, and advanced. I fly through those and I am on my way!

To begin my adventure in Turkey I log on to SCOLA On the Street Videos. I am most curious about the photos of the protestors I stumbled across in People and Places, so my first stop is to visit Taksim Square in Istanbul. Taksim Square was recently the site of many protests, with many people showing up to support the park instead of turning it into a mall. I also learn about a series of protests that occurred last year, in which workers, teachers, doctors, dentists, and engineers all joined in on the strike. They marched around Mersin chanting and holding signs, urging the government to listen.

For my next stop in Turkey, I wanted to learn more about a lighter subject, so I talk to some of the locals about their favorite hobbies. One young girl shows me games she plays on her computer, then I watch a young photographer take shots of young children in a variety of settings.

I was able to see a few different sides of Turkey today, and because of that I consider this trip a success! Join me in my travels today by visiting www.scola.org and accessing your free trial!

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Bringing Out the Best in SCOLA

As our users enjoy the authentic material SCOLA offers, many may wonder how the resources came to be available to us. Everything available to users on www.scola.org has been sent in to us from providers in countries around the world. SCOLA providers regularly send in TV programs, photos, publications and much more to ensure that our subscribers have the most current and applicable information.

Our providers are the ones who make the work we do at SCOLA possible, and between launching a new website, creating Savoir-Vivre, and updating our existing services daily, SCOLA also stays busy with many special projects, such as conferences and presentations. Our subscribers are always enthusiastic and willing to help, whether we need short clips of them singing a song, a video greeting for a special guest at a conference, or sending information on love and marriage for our upcoming 28 Days of Love. All of our special projects are in addition to the regular material our providers send in for services like World TV Online, On the Street Videos and Insta-Class.

SCOLA staff enjoys hearing about our providers daily lives, learning about their culture and viewing the new and exciting material they send in. Recently, we got to hear from a few of our providers about what they enjoy most about working with SCOLA:

“I take pleasure and feel that all these treasures of India should be shared with the rest of the world.  I also feel that one grows by learning about different cultures of the world and brings all the people closer like a universal family and does away with any misunderstandings which may exist.  It is very important for international peace and understanding and I congratulate SCOLA for doing such nice work.”
-Jitendra, India

     “Listening to a different language always encourages me to learn it. It is good to know.  My grandfather always said “Speaking one language makes you one person, speaking two languages makes you two persons.” Learn a new language and be happy.”
-Doa, Turkey

“…how fascinating it is to know the culture of other countries. This will make people from all over the world come closer and understand each other. This will make the world a more peaceful and better place to live in.”   -Jyoti, India

“[SCOLA] brings out the best in you. It has exposed me to so many aspects of TV production as well as areas of untapped knowledge, culture and much more.”
– Mercy, Nigeria

      In Mercy’s words, our providers bring out the best in SCOLA. The work the providers do for SCOLA makes our mission, to help the people of the world learn about one another; their cultures, their languages and their ideologies, possible. We are very thankful we have found so many people around the world that share the same passion of educating the world about one another. Without the hard work of our providers, SCOLA would not have the authentic language learning materials that so many of our subscribers learn from and enjoy. Their hard work is appreciated by all SCOLA staff and users!

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Learn a New Language and Be Happy

     Doa, our provider from Turkey, continues to help SCOLA users learn about new languages and cultures by sending SCOLA material from her country. Recently, Doa shared her thoughts on learning new languages and how SCOLA can help you meet your language learning goals:

     “Hi, I’m Doa from Turkey. I have been sending material to SCOLA for 7 years.  These material are mainly TV programming, videos, photographs, newspapers and magazines. Also I translate part of a TV show every week. Then I prepare a Turkish lesson from this translation and  I add questions and vocabulary. If you want to learn Turkish, you can find the Turkish and English translation on the same page.  You could learn a few words in Turkish every week. While you are listening to the video you can read the English translation.  You could learn Turkish by yourself.

       I record TV programs in 5 different languages every day. These languages are Turkish, Zaza, Georgian, Kurdish and Arabic. In Turkey there are Turkish, Kurdish, Zaza, Sorani, Arabic, Circassian and Laz people. They can all speak Turkish and their native languages.   Some Turkish television channels broadcast in these languages.

     I cannot speak Kurdish or Zaza but while I’m recording the news shows on TV,  I always feel like learning these languages. I say myself “Kurdish people can speak Turkish why don’t I speak Kurdish or Zaza?”

     Most recently, Doa has started sending SCOLA “Ma“. “Ma” is a culture, art and literature magazine about the Zaza people and was first published in May 2013. The magazine  was founded by musicians Mikail Aslan and Devrim Tekinoglu. “Ma” is very important work for Zaza people since it will help their language live so new generations will not forget their native language.

     Since Zaza people mainly live in Turkey they mostly speak Turkish, therefore the Zaza language is in danger of being forgotten. In recent years, Zaza people have been producing more literature works to improve their language. “Ma” magazine is one of the pioneers of this mission. Zaza people living in countries other than Turkey are looking for a way to obtain “Ma” and SCOLA will be an easy and accessible way for them to read the magazine.

   Doa’s final thought was “Listening to a different language always encourages me to learn it. It is good to know.  My grandfather always said “Speaking one language makes you one person, speaking two languages makes you two persons.”   Learn a new language and be happy.”

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Behind the Scenes: Meet Soza

This summer, SCOLA received new material from Syria for our Foreign Text and International Radio services. We could not have acquired any of this information without our Syrian provider, Soza. Soza has been very active in sending uSoza.photography.s material for many of our services, including On the Street Videos and Savoir-Vivre.

Soza is 22 years old and from the northeastern city of Qamishli. A Soza.photographyvariety of people, including Muslims, Assyrians, Armenians, Arabs, Kurds and Christians live peacefully in Qamishli. Soza speaks Kurdish, Arabic, English, and Turkish. She would like to learn French one day as well. Soza had to learn Turkish when her family took refuge in Turkey as a result of the Syrian war. Because of her language skills she was able to get a job as a translator at a Turkish trading company and there she learned Turkish.

The war has been hard on Soza because she lost one of her best friends in it and it has prevented her from continuing her education. Soza was in her fourth year of studying Psychology at Damascus University, but she had to quit because of the war. Someday she hopes to go back.

Soza has also volunteered for the Syrian Society for Social Development in her free time. The society aims to rehabilitate prisoners under the age of eighteen. She currently volunteers with a variety of other charities that help Syrian refugees. Soza has also previously worked as an Arabic and English teacher.syrian society for social development

Soza’s favorite SCOLA services are International Radio, Savoir-Vivre, On the Street Videos, Language Training Materials, Foreign Text and People and Places. Soza’s hobbies include photography and music. The photos in this post were all taken by her. Soza also enjoys teaching students about her language and culture. Soza says she will continue working with her charities anسنغd hobbies because that is what she treasures.

SCOLA appreciates the material Soza sends and we appreciate the fact that she is helping our subscribers learn so much about Syria and the Arabic language.

To view the material Soza and other providers from around the world have sent visit http://www.scola.org.

 

 

 

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Behind the Scenes- Meet Doa

DoaLast month, we introduced you to our Moroccan provider, Karima. This month, we would like you to meet Doa, our provider from Turkey. Doa has sent us a variety of material to kickoff our second Country of the Month.

Doa ( Doga Gulgun Gunenc ) was born in Gaziantep, Turkey in 1966. She started learning English as a second language when she was 11 years old in Gaziantep Anadolu Lisesi.  In 1989, she graduated from Hacettepe University, in the English Language and Literature Department. Since then, Doa has translated many film scripts, cartoons and documentaries for TRT Turkish Television.  She also translated “The Gladiators”, a book about Roman history by Fik Meijer.

Doa is currently an English teacher in a public school. She has an 11 year old son and a 15 year old son. She enjoys coaching them in tennis in her free time.

In addition to her personal and professional life, Doa started translating for SCOLA in 2006. She currently prepares Insta-Class lessons in Turkish and provides additional learning material for different SCOLA projects.

Check out the information Doa shared for the Country of the Month by visiting our Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Google+ accounts!

Your Global News Source

It’s easy to stay up to date on local news. Whether you’re in your car listening to the radio, watching the nightly news, or browsing your daily newspaper, it’s everywhere. However, staying up to date on international news may not be as easy. Your local news stations and newspapers may not report on the international topics you care about, or maybe they report on it, but it is not as in depth as you would like.  No matter the issue, SCOLA is here to help.

You probably already know SCOLA services help with language learning needs, but they can also help keep you informed of worldly events. From nightly news casts on World TV Online to daily newspapers on Foreign Text, international news is frequently featured in many of our services.

osv promo     One current event making international news is the uprising in Turkey. The following is Doa’s account of the political uprising in Turkey and the description of the video she sent of a street demonstration, which can be viewed in On The Street Videos.

“Great Leader Ataturk made a lot of reforms between years 1922 and  1937.Before Ataturk the regime in Turkey was sultanate. Ataturk abolished sultanate in 1922 and founded Turkish Republic.  Religious courts were closed and civil law was accepted in 1926. He closed madrasas, the religious schools and opened national schools. Ataturk made a revolution for alphabet and Latin alphabet was accepted instead of Arabic letters. He made reforms for clothes of men and women.  People of Turkey left Arabic style of clothes and head scarf and they started to wear European clothes.  Ataturk encouraged the farmers and repaired the economic situation.  He also changed units of calendar, clock and measurement from Arabic into European units of measurement.  In 1930 women achieved voting rights. Ataturk made a very big modernization on every aspect of life in Turkey. He is the founder of Modern Turkish Republic.

All these happened about 90 years ago. But today’s government is trying to convert all the revolutions and they want to bring back the sultanate regime. As you may follow on international television news shows of most of the channels, there is an uprising in Turkey. Turkish youth is revolting against this Islamic government to get back our freedom.

Everything started when the government decided to build a shopping center instead of Gezi Park in Taksim. Young people put tents in the park and started to live in there. But the government attacked on them with water cannons and tear gas.  When the government attacked violently on peaceful people the anger of the public grew out more and more.

This violent scene has been going on for 18 days now  (today is 17th June 2013).  Instead of moderation, the government continues violence. The police has been throwing  hundreds of tear bombs to people on the streets and even into the hospitals and hotels. But Turkish people are determined. This revolt will continue until the Islamist government resigns.  ”

The video:

It is a general strike. There were workers, teachers, doctors, dentists and engineers in that crowd. I was one of them and I also called out those chants. On the first yellow sign is “Everybody should have Syndicate”

The people say:

“AKP (the governing party) go to hell, The Public to the Parliament”

“We stand side by side against Fascism”

“Don’t stand on the Grass Tayyip, you smash the grass, don’t be offended Tayyip but you look like a lamp” (Tayyip is the first name of the prime minister. Their party symbol is a lamp 🙂

Everywhere is Taksim, everywhere is riot” (THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT CHANT)

“I’ve got kettles and pans, I’m a looter and I’m pretty cool” (Prime minister called most of the public as looters since they got out to street for riot and they started to make noise with kettles and pans.)

“The day will come, everything will be vice versa and AKP will be responsible for all the damage”

“This is just the beginning, struggle will go on”

Snapshot 1 (6-19-2013 9-24 AM)Also there were signs of the Unions

GENERAL WORKERS UNION

MERSIN DOCTORS UNION

ENGINEERS UNION

TEACHERS UNION

Doa requests SCOLA users keep informed of what is going on in Turkey. You can learn more about Turkey on our website at http://www.scola.org and all of our social media pages, as it is June’s country of the month.