Nothing Good on TV? Look No Further!

You know those times during the day you complain that there is nothing good on TV? Look no further!

SCOLA began retransmitting foreign language newscasts via satellite to affiliates one hour per day in August 1987, but since then that one hour has grown to 24 hours a day, 365 days a year!  International television from WELCOME118 countries in 122 languages is featured on eight geographically designated channels around the clock. News, talk, drama, children’s and music programming is played exactly as viewers see it in their own countries.  Users can search 50,000+ programs by country, language, or channel, and then download it or stream live for personal or instructional use.

Are you traveling for work and want to know what is going on in your home country?

World TV Online is great for people who live, work, or are traveling outside of their home country because they can watch the news and their television programs just like if they were at home.

Do you want to know what is going on in other parts of the world, but your local news station doesn’t thoroughly cover international topics?

With World TV Online’s eight channels covering Europe, Spanish and Portuguese, Confucius Institute (China), Asia, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and Eurasia you are sure to find the country and news story that you are looking for.

Not only does World TV Online help you stay up to date on the latest international news, it can also help our users learning a new language. Hear vocabulary words spoken in native context and download clips for future reference.

Interested in accessing World TV Online or any of our other great services? Contact SCOLA today for your free trial!

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The SCOLA Story

Sometimes it is fun to take a look into the past, whether it be at old pictures, videos, newspapers or journals, and see how much times have changed. Recently we stumbled upon a blog post written by Father Lee Lubbers in April 2006. The post is a timeline of the evolution of SCOLA, beginning when Father Lubbers founded the organization. The following are some key points of Father Lubbers’ and SCOLA’s past:

“1979 to 1981, the gradual DEREGULATION 20 of satellites and the birth of the Private Satellite Industry.

Last resort, I presented Mike Morrison, President of Creighton University with a list of the only three places I thought to be feasible for antenna interference-free installation, and asked him for a decision. The three places were: a) the grassy sward just outside and under the windows of his office; b) the only large grassy lawn on the mall, next to the Kiewit Center; and c) where Brother Jelinek, V.P, in charge of buildings and grounds, parked his car. Mike nixed the first two, and demurred from even touching the delicate question of Brother Jelinek’s parking place, leaving me dangling to face Jelinek all by myself.

Jelinek predictably vetoed for all eternity and beyond any chance of putting nonsense like this in his parking place. BUT, he said we should put it on the roof of the maintenance garage down on the Old Football field level.

We bought a little tin shelter for a couple of decoder receivers, the kind of tool shed you put in your backyard to shelter the lawnmower;

Summer of 1982-1983 cabling through the tunnels a mainline to all the buildings on campus. THIS BEGAN THE CABLE SYSTEM FOR CREIGHTON UNIVERSITY

1983. FIRST CONFERENCE “Come and See” campus Cable Systems.

Lubbers traveled coast to coast demonstrating a portable version of our tracking system mounted in the bed of the pickup truck; I would drive up to the campus, plug in, and in a minute or less the signal popped in. Learned University people simply could not understand nor believe that this could provide “Live” internal Russian Television till they saw it with their own eyes.

1985-1986, SCOLA conferences promoting Russian, entertaining Russians from Siberia, Lubbers two trips all over Russia, including a SCOLA Conference sponsored by the Orbital Mechanics in Krasnoyarsk U.S. Govt. people with first names begin to attend our conferences.

1988-1990: multiplication of Receive-only antennas; University Executives nervous.

1992-1993: Lubbers stumbles onto Pottawattamie County Home–it being cautiously (they avoided “fly-by-night offers) available on the market; after several solo sneaky visits to the property, peeking in windows, hiking the perimeter, even visiting the postmaster, stepping over or under the rusty pipe barrier blocking the driveway, etc. drags Francis and Dick Kuhns out to view it

October, 1992: we declare official interest in the property after a complete tour and price discussion with county officials. In their turn county supervisors inspect our history on the CU campus, solidity and viability of the business.

JANUARY 1, 1993: SCOLA with completed title began taking possession of the POOR FARM.

1990’s: Early major visit of the PRC Shanxi TV Vice President for the express purpose of making a 10-year cooperation agreement with SCOLA. This provided 8-person teams of Chinese TV professionals to be in residence here for 18-month periods, assist us with initiation of a 24-hour CHINA CHANNEL and many other advantages to us and all American students.

2002: Lubbers (finally) nominates Dick Kuhns as Chairman of the Board, and Francis Lajba as President and CEO.

Dick Kuhns dies and Francis nominates SENATOR DAVID KARNES as Chairman of the Board.

SCOLA channels with 120 countries in 80-plus languages

Most recent Conference (April 20-21, 2006) succeeds in reaching 100 fathoms under-ocean placement of gala dining with the sharks and other ancestors, Omaha Henry Doorly ZOO.

July 4th weekend: added CHANNEL 5 beautifully and successfully.”

Since Father Lubber’s 2006 post, a lot has changed at SCOLA. In the past 7 years we have added three more channels, had hundreds of guests visit for our annual conference, rebuilt and improved the SCOLA website, and added new services. We also currently have resources from 160 countries in over 200 languages! This year we are working on launching a more user-friendly website that offers enhanced search capabilities. In addition to the new website, we are currently constructing the anxiously awaited Savoir-Vivre.

To see the full post from Father Lubber’s blog visit http://scolastory.livejournal.com/10487.html.

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Learn a New Language and Be Happy

     Doa, our provider from Turkey, continues to help SCOLA users learn about new languages and cultures by sending SCOLA material from her country. Recently, Doa shared her thoughts on learning new languages and how SCOLA can help you meet your language learning goals:

     “Hi, I’m Doa from Turkey. I have been sending material to SCOLA for 7 years.  These material are mainly TV programming, videos, photographs, newspapers and magazines. Also I translate part of a TV show every week. Then I prepare a Turkish lesson from this translation and  I add questions and vocabulary. If you want to learn Turkish, you can find the Turkish and English translation on the same page.  You could learn a few words in Turkish every week. While you are listening to the video you can read the English translation.  You could learn Turkish by yourself.

       I record TV programs in 5 different languages every day. These languages are Turkish, Zaza, Georgian, Kurdish and Arabic. In Turkey there are Turkish, Kurdish, Zaza, Sorani, Arabic, Circassian and Laz people. They can all speak Turkish and their native languages.   Some Turkish television channels broadcast in these languages.

     I cannot speak Kurdish or Zaza but while I’m recording the news shows on TV,  I always feel like learning these languages. I say myself “Kurdish people can speak Turkish why don’t I speak Kurdish or Zaza?”

     Most recently, Doa has started sending SCOLA “Ma“. “Ma” is a culture, art and literature magazine about the Zaza people and was first published in May 2013. The magazine  was founded by musicians Mikail Aslan and Devrim Tekinoglu. “Ma” is very important work for Zaza people since it will help their language live so new generations will not forget their native language.

     Since Zaza people mainly live in Turkey they mostly speak Turkish, therefore the Zaza language is in danger of being forgotten. In recent years, Zaza people have been producing more literature works to improve their language. “Ma” magazine is one of the pioneers of this mission. Zaza people living in countries other than Turkey are looking for a way to obtain “Ma” and SCOLA will be an easy and accessible way for them to read the magazine.

   Doa’s final thought was “Listening to a different language always encourages me to learn it. It is good to know.  My grandfather always said “Speaking one language makes you one person, speaking two languages makes you two persons.”   Learn a new language and be happy.”

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The SCOLA Symposium: An Introduction

Welcome to The SCOLA Symposium! Since you have found our blog you probably already know what we do here at SCOLA, but to those of you that do not, I will use this first post to introduce ourselves.

In 1981, Lee Lubbers, S.J.,  established SCOLA as a foreign language cable television system on the campus of Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. The system delivered popular television stations of the time along with programs from Canada, Mexico, and the USSR. SCOLA was the first international cable system of its time in the United States, and one of the first cable systems. It became a model other academic institutions looked up to.

In 1990 SCOLA began Out-Write Service, which featured transcripts from the first five minutes of selected newscasts in its original language and English. The transcripts included key words, vocabulary lists, and quizzes for SCOLA affiliated teachers to use as classroom activities. The Out-Write Service is now known as Insta-Class.  The feature started with French, Japanese, Russian, and German and now holds over 50 languages!

With SCOLA’s growth came the need for a different location, so in 1993 SCOLA relocated to a 13-acre property in McClelland, Iowa. Twenty years later, SCOLA remains in McClelland, which is a twenty minute drive from downtown Omaha.

SCOLA continued to grow and gained an online presence  in  2006 when all SCOLA programming became available via the internet and the interactive and informative website, http://www.scola.org, was launched. Today, the website  has ten interactive resources and tools, utilized by language learners around the world.

World TV Online is SCOLA’s international television programming featuring eight geographically designated channels accessible 24/365. It streams news, talk, drama, children’s and music programming exactly as people see it in their own countries. All of the programs are available to SCOLA subscribers for downloading and live streaming.

People and Places is an ever-growing, original snapshot gallery of SCOLA friends from around the world and the places they live. There are currently over 27,000 vibrant pictures to browse, download and display for any educational purpose.

International Radio holds exotic radio broadcasts featuring SCOLA Exclusives: Afghan Women’s Radio and rare Mayan dialects. Subscribers can also listen to seldom heard news and talk shows, music and more in over 40 languages.

Learning Objects are SCOLA’s interactive, self-contained language lessons geared toward independent study. The lessons provide instructive assessment and feedback from a sociocultural perspective.

On the Street Videos contain compelling videos from around the world produced exclusively for SCOLA. The videos are designed to present the native language as it is spoken informally among friends and neighbors. Family and cultural celebrations, weddings and wedding toasts, sports, parades and interviews on intriguing topics are examples of what you can find in the videos.

Language Training Materials are unique travelogue-style videos from every corner of the globe produced exclusively for SCOLA and narrated by native speakers. Introductory level language lessons and other activities featuring text, videos, quizzes and vocabulary lists are also available.

Specialized Word Video Search holds a searchable collection of over 150,000 specialized native language words. Users are able to view a native language video clip containing the words, listen to an audible pronunciation and hear the words spoken in context.

Foreign Text is a global newsstand of newspapers, magazines and books. The resource includes unabridged publications that present news, sports, entertainment, political commentary and more. Foreign Text features OCR technology.

Video Editor allows users to easily create smaller clips of SCOLA videos for downloading and we understand that not all of the information in each video is applicable to your needs. Our videos, including full length news broadcasts, entertainment programming and talk shows, contain a lot of information! Video Editor can be accessed from each SCOLA service that contains videos.

All SCOLA services are now available through Mobile Apps.

These resources guide SCOLA in fulfilling our mission:

“To to help the people of the world learn about one another; their cultures, their languages and their ideologies. SCOLA emphasizes the importance and effectiveness of modern information technology as a tool in overcoming barriers to global understanding and will remain at the forefront of its application.”

In the coming weeks we are looking forward to unveiling our new website, hosting our annual Users Meeting, and launching new resources and programs for our subscribers to enjoy.

The SCOLA blog will be updated weekly to keep you informed about SCOLA resources and events and current news we think will be beneficial for language learners. If you would like more frequent SCOLA updates we are available on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google+, and LinkedIn. These websites will also have information about the SCOLA Country of the Month! Moroccan recipes, photos, and other fun facts will be shared in the month of May.

You can also subscribe to our monthly newsletter by e-mailing lduhacek@scola.org.

SCOLA values your feedback, so please feel free to create discussions relevant to the posts in the comment section below.