SCOLA Travel Journal: Week Twenty-Five

I sit down at my computer and soon I am off on my next adventure with SCOLA‘s newest and most exciting service, Savoir-Vivre. So far with Savoir-Vivre I have been able to travel to a zoo in Macedonia where I discovered komodo dragons in Indonesia and migratory birds in Japan, and I also visited a hotel in Thailand where it was recommended I try the delicious food at Mozem Soba House in Japan, and went on a family holiday in Port Harcourt, toured Bhaktapur City in Nepal, and went dolphin watching in Bali! With all this adventure you would think I’d be worn out, but traveling the world with Savoir-Vivre is made easy! All it takes is a few clicks of my mouse and I am ready for my next journey.

Spring has sprung here in Iowa, and many plants are starting to bloom. This makes me wonder what kind of plants are grown in other parts of the world, and where could I buy them? I click on the flower icon on the Savoir-Vivre map to find out. I’m instantly transported to the streets of Iran where I can walk forward until I find a flower shop called Aftab. I explore the flower shop and quickly discover Native Plants found around the world. I travel to India where a group of people plant trees on World Environment Day, to Turkey where a man sells cactus on the streets of Mersin, and then to Syria where I meet women working on a cotton farm. A short time later I am exploring different flower shops in places like Georgia, India, and Indonesia. After my adventures I find myself back in Aftab, ready to see where Savoir-Vivre will take me next!

I may not have the time or money to travel around the world learning about other cultures, but that didn’t stop me from experiencing several countries today! Join me on my adventure with a free log in for our blog followers. User username WordPress and password Scola2015 at www.scola.org to access Savoir-Vivre and other wonderful SCOLA services for FREE!

Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedIn | Google+ | YouTube

Advertisements

SCOLA Travel Journal: Week Eighteen

Scrolling through newspapers on Foreign Text I have to pause and do a double take when I see Georgia listed as a country. Georgia? A country? But that can’t be right…Georgia is a state in the southern United States! I must research this further so I head on over to Country Overview Videos under the Language Training Materials. Here I learn that Georgia is also the name of a country in Europe. I also learn about Georgia’s climate, education system, government, and much, much more! However, as we have learned in the past through SCOLA On the Street Videos, what better way to learn about a country than to experience it?

I don’t have to waste any time searching for my passport or packing my bags, as soon as I log on to On the Street Videos I am on my way to Georgia! The first thing that catches my eye as I arrive in Tbilisi is a flower bazaar. There are so many different kinds of flowers, with florists working hard to make bouquets for their customers. It would be a shame to return from my trip without a souvenir, so I buy a dozen roses and continue on my way.

My next stop in Georgia is a history museum. Since I was completely unaware of this country until today, I’d like to know about the country’s past. I meet with Mrs. Tamar Abunadze and Mrs. Ekha Maizuradze, both employees of the history museum. While talking to the women I learn about the Khazbegi region, a mythological story about Sameba, and about the life of Georgian Queen Tamar.

As I head home from this adventure with On the Street Videos, I am feeling very enlightened! Waking up today I never thought I would be exploring a country that was completely new to me! I can’t wait to continue my adventures with SCOLA On the Street Videos next week!

Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedIn | Google+ | YouTube

Behind the Scenes: Meet Mari

We would like to send a special thank you to our provider Mari in Georgia! This month Mari sent us interesting and informative material to teach our followers all about our Country of the Month.

            MMariarine ( Mari) Changiani was born on April 4th in Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia. She is married and has a beautiful daughter, Barbara. Marine has her Masters Degree in English Language and Literature. She has been working as an English teacher for ESL for over twelve years. She also works as a director of the American Education Center “Langate”. She has students from many different countries. Mari loves to communicate and make friends all over the world.

Mari started working with SCOLA in 2012 and enjoys the task of providing On the Street Videos every month. She likes to introduce the world to her small country and often sends videos about Georgia, its culture, history and traditions. She tries to participate in SCOLA’s projects as often as possible as it is a great pleasure for her. She is very grateful to her students and friends who help her make videos for SCOLA often.

She likes working for SCOLA not only for opportunity to provide interesting materials and videos, but because of SCOLA’s warm and friendly staff. She would like to thank all SCOLA staff and she hopes to work with them for a very long time providing SCOLA with more and more exciting and interesting videos.

SCOLA staff appreciates all the hard work Mari puts in to help our subscribers learn about Georgia. We look forward to seeing more of her work in the future!

Check back next week to learn about our new Country of the Month!

Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedIn | Google+ | YouTube

Want to go to School in Georgia? Read this First!

Most students in the United States have either already gone back to school, or are anxiously preparing to in the next few weeks. However, students in Georgia, our Country of the Month, can still enjoy lazy days of sleeping in late and hanging out with friends until mid-September. Although schools in Georgia don’t return from summer vacation until later in the year, there are some ways that they are similar to schools in the United States.

Georgia has public and private schools. Public schools are free, however private schools are expensive and can cost around $3,000-$5,000 per year. Private school students have the opportunity to join different clubs, such as Art, Drama, and Science. Private schools also offer a school bus as a means of transportation to and from home for their students.

Students in Georgia go to school for twelve years. The first step of the Georgian education program lasts four years and is much like primary school in the United States. Children generally have 4-5 classes per day, which last approximately 45 minutes each. Students study courses such as Math, Georgian Language, Art, Music, Nature, PE and English. Students attend school five days a week, Monday through Friday.

After the first four years of school, students move on and acquire more subjects including Chemistry, Physics, Algebra, Geometry, and Russian. On average, students at these grade levels take 6-7 classes per day. After the 9th grade, students have the option to stop their education, or continue on, finishing with 12th grade. After 12th grade, students can take the National Examination for Universities if they would like to further their education.

So, does Georgia sound like a country you would like to attend school in? Tell us in the comment section below!

Want to learn more about the education systems in other countries? Check out On the Street Videos and experience what life is like for an economics student in Madagascar, discover the shortages of qualified teachers in Namibia, explore the life of a student in his final school years at a teachers college in Burundi, and so much more! Visit scola.org today for your free trial.

Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | LinkedIn | Google+ | YouTube

Traditional Georgian Wine Making Methods

In Georgia, our Country of the Month, one of the traditional wine making methods involves the use of a Qvevri. A Qvevri is a large, clay Amphora like vessel that typically holds anywhere from 400-2,000 liters. The Qvevri is usually buried in the ground up to its neck.

To begin the wine making process, usually grapes are feet-pressed. This is the gegentlest way to obtain a juicy pulp because the seeds remain intact and does not give the wine a strong, bitter taste. Once the grapes have been feet-pressed, the pulp, skins, stalks and pips (often referred to as “the mother” in Kakheti) are placed into a Qvevri for fermentation. The fermentation is done naturally with no cultured yeasts or nutrients added. Next, the Qvevri is sealed with a wooden lid and earth or clay, and the wine is left to mature for up to six months. After six months, the Qvevri is opened to reveal a bright, delicious liquid.

Want to learn more about food and drink in our Country of the Month? Check out Savoir-Vivre, coming soon to SCOLA.org!